Month: April 2021

This guest post was written by Caroline Hardaker, author of Composite Creatures, a character-driven science fiction debut about the burgeoning relationship between two people set in a melancholic and mundane near-future climate change dystopia. When we think, we escape our biological bodies. We hardly ever reflect on it, but from the day we’re born until
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IMAGE: Figure. (A) Schematic illustration of the centrifugal multispinning polymer nanofiber production process. (B) The polymer nanofibers spun by the system. The increase of the number of sub-disk shows the proportional… view more  Credit: Professor Do Hyun Kim, KAIST KAIST researchers have developed a novel nanofiber production technique called ‘centrifugal multispinning’ that will open the door
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Today, bones hold us up. But for ancient jawless fishes, bones may have been a way to store energy for long journeys. Plus, new research indicated that hippos and cetaceans may have evolved their aquatic traits separately. Hosted by: Hank Green SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It’s called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org
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IMAGE: An array of multi-colored LEDs periodically arranged to give off visible light as shown above; a combination of InGaN based red, blue, and green LEDs is essential to cover lighting… view more  Credit: Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) Singapore, 12 April 2021 – Researchers from the Low Energy Electronic Systems (LEES) Interdisciplinary Research
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In an industry dependent on ever-changing technology, there’s no video game company quite like Nintendo. They made a name for themselves as the company so synonymous with gaming that parents called every game console “Nintendos” for years to come, and they’re still the source of some of gaming’s greatest modern experiences. There have been a
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Origami may sound more like art than science, but a complex folding pathway that proteins use to determine their shape has been harnessed by molecular biologists, enabling them to build some of the most complex synthetic protein nanostructures to date. Using EMBL Hamburg’s world-class beamline P12 at DESY’s PETRA III synchrotron, a team of Slovenian
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You’ve probably seen the pyramidal diagram of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. It’s straightforward enough but, it might be a bit too subjective to really measure human needs. Hosted by: Brit Garner ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ———- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Kelly Landrum Jones, Sam Lutfi,
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This episode is brought to you by the Music for Scientists album! Stream the album on major music services here: https://streamlink.to/music-for-scientists. Check out “The Idea” music video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUyT94aGmbc. Dark Energy is what we call the mysterious force that seems to be pushing the universe apart. By some calculations, it makes up 70% of everything
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This Shameless review contains spoilers. Shameless Season 11 Episode 12 “We’re still here. We’re surviving, right?”  Most people would likely not argue that Shameless’s best years are behind it. Showtime, its cable network, even briefly had a reputation for bleeding series dry long after they should have ended. However, even the most egregious examples of
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This The Nevers review contains spoilers. The Nevers Episode 1 Who is The Nevers for? Not kids, clearly. The frolicsome humour, cartoony performances and grade school social commentary might suggest so, but the nudity, cursing and blood say no. It’s meant for adults then, those of us happy to go along with the essential YA-ness of its ‘Victorian orphanage
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This Fear the Walking Dead review contains spoilers.  Fear the Walking Dead Season 6 Episode 8 Well, damn. This is a real heartbreaker of an episode, isn’t it? If you haven’t heeded the spoiler warning above, here’s another one for you: MAJOR SPOILERS AHEAD for this episode. If for some reason you jumped straight to this review without first watching
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IMAGE: Reductive amination of carbonyl compounds view more  Credit: Osaka University Osaka, Japan – Catalysts are crucial to making industrial processes viable. However, many of the non-precious metal catalysts used for synthesis have low activity, are difficult to handle, and/or require harsh reaction conditions. Osaka University researchers have developed a single-crystal cobalt phosphide nanorod catalyst that
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IMAGE: Using an atmosphere switching strategy followed by electrochemical dealloying, researchers have synthesized composition-graded PtCu3@Pt3Cu@Pt nanodendrites exposing high index surfaces, which exhibited excellent ORR activity and stability in acidic electrolytes…. view more  Credit: Chinese Journal of Catalysis Alloying is a general and efficient strategy to boost the catalytic activity of Pt catalysts toward oxygen reduction reaction
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People say Einstein had an IQ of 160, and you need an IQ score higher than 130 to join Mensa. But does IQ really measure how intelligent you are? Hosted by: Hank Green ———- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ———- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters—we couldn’t make SciShow
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Whether you don’t know the difference between a mark and a bump or you can name the main event of every WrestleMania, you’re probably aware of at least some of the absolute best wrestling games of all-time. Titles like SmackDown: Here Comes the Pain, WWF No Mercy, and WCW/NWO Revenge have transcended the popularity of
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IMAGE: Weimin Chen, professor at Linköping University. view more  Credit: Peter Modin/LiU It may be possible in the future to use information technology where electron spin is used to store, process and transfer information in quantum computers. It has long been the goal of scientists to be able to use spin-based quantum information technology at room
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IMAGE: Electron microscopy images show the degradation in action. view more  Credit: University of Sydney Ferroelectric materials are used in many devices, including memories, capacitors, actuators and sensors. These devices are commonly used in both consumer and industrial instruments, such as computers, medical ultrasound equipment and underwater sonars. Over time, ferroelectric materials are subjected to repeated
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